Adrenal Health Ask Me Archives


Question:
In terms of Vitamin C’s relation to cortisol, STRESS causes excess cortisol production, which depletes Vit. C. in the adrenal gland, correct?

Vit. C supplementation (like in your protocol), in turn, reduces excess cortisol, which in turn helps negate its destructive effects and helps to counteract the negative aspects of stress.

However, what does Vit. C do is someone is LOW cortisol 24-7?

Answer:
Approach to Adrenal Fatigue

One of the things that Vitamin C does is to help the body produce cortisol. However, cortisol is not the total answer to achieving recovery from Adrenal Fatigue, though it is a key and very important component. Vitamin C’s mechanism of action touches many very important and different pathways within the body in addition to helping cortisol production. The basic science of Vitamin C is highly technical and falls within a discipline called oxidative medicine, and it involves re-dox pathways and how the body transfers electrons and deals with oxidation.

The broader question as to how Vitamin C is tied to Adrenal Fatigue is colored by my overall philosophical approach as to how best to achieve recovery from Adrenal Fatigue. Here, I will take some time to expand on this because this will serve to make it clearer on why I do things the way I do.

First, Vitamin C does not reduce cortisol production. Cortisol itself acts as a negative feedback loop because once the body perceives that it has an adequate supply at any point in time, cortisol production will be shut down, even though cortisol lab result may be low and one can still have symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue. That is why lab results are sometimes a very reliable indicator, among many other reasons, especially for those with advanced Adrenal Fatigue. We see this clinically.

Second, most people with advanced Adrenal Fatigue have multiple convoluted issues concurrently. Cortisol is one of the key connecting points, but it is seldom the only one. One simply cannot explain all symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue in most cases by cortisol alone, and that is why the Adrenal Fatigue toolbox needs to have many different tools in addition to Vitamin C, to tackle the different pathways ranging from metabolic to neurological. This explains why Vitamin C alone is not a panacea that will work in all situations. In some people, taking Vitamin C can even backfire, and the reasons for this may not even be related to cortisol level at all. It is important to remember that each nutrient has its positive and negative points. To affect the best recovery from Adrenal Fatigue gradually over time and without crashes, which is the hallmark of clinical excellence, we need to assess the situation on a real-time basis and in a consistent and systematic way, using various nutrients and challenges. The body changes all the time, especially when it is not stable, and this is why Adrenal Fatigue recovery is so challenging. That also explains why Vitamin C and cortisol will work better sometimes but not others, and one really has to look at the root cause to really understand the situation. The recovery process is like a blind person trying to cross a river with lots of rapids. Naturally, the blind person has to feel his or her way while crossing the river. This is very much like medicine, as most astute clinicians will tell you, modern medicine is more an art than a science, especially in the case of Adrenal Fatigue where our understanding in this area is still in the infancy stage.

Third, to understand the how Vitamin C, cortisol and Adrenal Fatigue interact, we really need to look at the whole picture and also each person’s intrinsic root weakness. It is important to remember that each person’s constitution is very different and the true root cause may or may not be the adrenals at all, and this means that it will take some time to sort things out properly. For example, some women have overwhelming ovarian weakness, and this may then be expressed as Adrenal Fatigue. While Vitamin C and cortisol may support the adrenals and reduce fatigue, the ovarian issues will continue to haunt the sufferer for years thereafter. For these women, fatigue may improve, but brain fog, anxiety, and estrogen issues etc. will continue to persist. Adrenal Fatigue therefore may be an indicator of internal dysfunction and one should always be on alert for this when trying to figure out the root cause of Adrenal Fatigue.

If you understand the above three points, then you will appreciate why my approach to Adrenal Fatigue is holistic-based and not only symptoms-driven, as I believe that the holistic approach is the only effective long term solution. Those who want quick fixes may find my approach disappointing and slow, even though in my experience, my approach is far gentler and will bring about faster results when compared to other approaches. Sadly, expectations are difficult to manage because each person has a different timeline. I tend to say goodbye to those I find to be too focused on quick fixes, because while it is relatively easy for me to recommend that they take certain stimulant nutrients to enhance their energy levels, this approach is likely to eventually backfire and end in failure.

Most people do not realize that they can only go as fast as their bodies will permit to affect long term sustained recovery, and furthermore, that each person’s constitution is different from the next. I can only facilitate, but not mandate, what the body will do. Some people will do well in a short period of time, while others may take a long preparation period to get their bodies to adjust. If the desired results are not achieved, there is usually a very good reason behind it. No amount of water can put out a fire if fuel is continuously being added on the side, and for those in this category, it will take a systematic approach to figure things out, one step at a time. The reason is out there, if one simply has to look deep and hard enough. That is usually the case. Those who focus on understanding their bodies will likely find it, and my job is to try and educate them, facilitating that understanding. Those who are primarily interested in finding quick fixes (as this is what conventional medicine has somewhat conditioned most of us to do) will eventually give up because their bodies will rebel and often times not cooperate. The source of the problem lies within, and nutrients should be used as support to effect long-term internal changes. This approach happens to be my primary focus – achieving long-term recovery. That is why I try to ask each person to keep a journal, and I shall try to teach them what their bodies are telling them each day and with each adrenal crash. Adrenal recovery is a long journey, and it is also a learning process. Those who are good students will find recovery to be a process that is enjoyable, despite what appears to be stagnation and crashes from time to time. I try to explain many of the above concepts in the various articles in my website. It is common for many who are persistent but see little dramatic results initially, to later thank me for their improvements which will have become very evident and permanent when they look back 4-6 months later. That is the beauty of allowing the body to heal itself – but for some, this takes longer than their patience will allow them.

A few months is a short time to repair a body that has decades of harm done to it. Accordingly, taking cortisol and Vitamin C, while important as they relate to adrenal function, must be put into proper perspective, and this is why sometimes you see people with a normal cortisol curve but have advanced adrenal weakness. In addition, when the adrenals recover, one has to know when to reduce Vitamin C usage. So there is a lot more to the Vitamin C and cortisol equation when viewed from the clinical perspective instead of that from the academic science perspective.

To effect safe and gentle adrenal recovery, my approach starts with looking at the big picture and then slowly narrowing down to certain specifics once the body stabilizes, but not before. I do factor in cortisol and Vitamin C if the adrenals are dominant, but in my experience, blindly rushing into resolving the symptoms will only lead to temporary relief, but seldom a sustained and total recovery from Adrenal Fatigue.

Most people with Adrenal Fatigue are inquisitive and rightfully looking for scientifically based answers. In particular, those who are looking for a linear explanation will be disappointed. I wish it were easier, as it has taken me years of study on this subject, and I am still learning. Focusing too much on trying to explain every single symptom or physiological pathway may be good psychologically, but often this increases anxiety, drains the body of its limited reserve, and retards total recovery, which are all undesirable. There is a gap between the basic science for academic purposes and the clinical reality on the front line, as exemplified by the use of Vitamin C and cortisol in the context of Adrenal Fatigue.


Question:
I read an excerpt from your web page on adrenal insufficiency. I am a senior year biochem student and I would like to do research in the area of endocrinology. I wanted to know your thoughts on how to best restore proper adrenal function – especially when excess androgens are produced due to alternate pathway. Do you think that it is best to utilize pregnenolone solely or would you use this in conjunction with progesterone and natural hydrocortisone. DHEA would be less preferable since symptoms of hyperandrogenism are often present (hirsutism, scalp hair loss, acne, etc…). I have noticed in women that this is often the symptom presentation associated with adrenal insufficiency. I appreciate any thoughts that you might have.

Answer:
The best way to restore proper adrenal function is to give it the raw materials for it to decide on its own how much to assimilate into the various hormones (each of which have a negative feedback system). What are these items? They include glandulars, lysine, proline, vitamin C, vitamin B5, all in quite a high dose. If you expect to get well with nutrients, you have to understand that nutrients are nontoxic and not very strong, so more is needed for health challenges. External introduction of DHEA, pregnenolone, progesterone, and natural cortisol will help short term, and can be used effectively to adjunct the adrenal recovery program (which normally will take 6-12 months). It takes a long time to deplete the adrenal glands, and it will take some time to recoup, so to say. Women do react differently to the hormonals compare to man, esp the DHEA as you have noticed. Adrenal recovery therefore requires 3 major factors to be done concurrently: a. basic nutrients as mentioned above properly dosed b. relieve of stressor(s) c. time ( together with diet and lifestyle changes) Most people focus on one of these, and don’t give it enough time. As a result, most people fail. I work with many who are at “end stage” adrenal fatigue and repeatly I have found that if they follow my protocol closely for about 3-6 months, they become happy campers. The problem is that they don’t have a lot of patience, and during the recovery process, one is likely (though not all the time) get worse before they get better. Just buying supplements and loading up will not help, for each person has to be titrated. One person’s nutrient is another’s poison. The dosage depends on each’s specific metabolic type. The solution is not as simple as most people think, otherwise, there is no need for people like us to study all our lives and gain the thorough insight into this most troublesome syndrome. Furthermore, you should note that adrenal fatigue in women seldom stands alone. In 90% of the cases, there are accompanying clinical or subclincal thyroid and estrogen imbalance. Keep an eye out as you are doing your research. I call this the OAT syndrome (ovarian/adrenal/thyroid imbalance)


Question:
I read on your website that DHEA declines as adrenal fatigue progresses. Several women I’ve met claim they have adrenal fatigue and yet they have high DHEA. Is this possible? I thought I might have adrenal fatigue, but I have high DHEA and am being tested for congenital adrenal hyper plasia. Is it possible to still have adrenal fatigue and have high DHEA?

Answer:
Depending on the stage of adrenal fatigue and on the person, the DHEA level can increase while adrenal fatigue is in progress. That is totally compatible. A high DHEA is indicative of an active adrenal gland, and your doctor’s concern is correct to make sure there is no tumor that is causing excessive DHEA secretion. From the adrenal fatigue perspective, DHEA must be viewed in conjunction with total cortisol. The purpose is to ascertain the degree of catabolic activity which is what causes the actual symptoms of adrenal fatigue. If the total cortisol to DHEA ratio is high, then there is excessive cortisol relative to DHEA. DHEA is an anabolic hormone (build up hormone) while cortisol is a catabolic hormone (breakdown tissues). DHEA by itself in the adrenal context has little meaning. Also, the number one cause of high DHEA is supplementation. Make sure that you are not on that when being tested.


Question:
I am a 48 years old lady who had hysterectomy with conservation of ovaries back in sept 97 due to CINII/III. In June 2002–this year, my blood pressure shot up to 150/110 and I was prescribed Natrilix. However, there was no effect and later I was prescribed Coversyl 4 mg. Still, my blood pressure remained elevated 150-140 over 100-95. The doctor then decided to increase the dosage to Coversyl 6mg and 1 tablet of Natrilix daily. My BP has since been between 130-118 over 90-80. I have symptoms of menopause– hot flashes, sleeplessness. However, the blood test showed that I am menopausal. My gynaecologist prescribed me 1 Premarin daily. I have been on this Hormone since 6th Oct 2002. I have noticed that it helped with my hot flashes but I have gained weight.
My Question is: Is it safe for me to continue with Premarin??? Recent reports in USA are about adversed reports on HRT treatment. I would appreciate your advice and comments.

Answer:
You have a very good question. There are millions of women with similar condition as you today. We will not deal with you high blood pressure as it appears to be under control by drugs. Your symptoms of weight gain etc may well be due to excessive estrogen with unopposed progesterone, a syndrome we called estrogen dominance. Unopposed synthetic estrogen (such as Premarin) given for “menopause” without consideration for natural (not synthetic) progesterone is a misguide treatment protocol of the last 40 year. Generally speaking, I do not recommend women to be on Premarin by itself. You may wish to consider some natural progesterone as well.


Question:
My mother is diabetic. I have always been overweight. Several years ago after getting divorced, I met a gentleman who was constantly ridiculing me about my weight, so I pretty much ate grilled chicken salads and lost 40 pounds, from 176 to around 131 give or take. I walked about 5 miles a day when I could. Since that time I moved to Florida with this gentleman, however, I have not been able to walk the 5 miles as I did before due to the neighborhood we live in, as well as his decline in health, (massive heart attack). Over this past two years the weight began to creep back up into the 140’s, 150’s. I have tried the high protein diet, the low carb diet; I went to a thyroid specialist thinking the weight gain was due to my thyroid (a handful of cases on my mother’s side) who prescribed xenecal which was an awful experience, then Mederia. He also had me on an antidepressant, one of the Serotonin Reuptake ones, which he felt would relieve the stress and help me to loose weight. After all of that I gained 5 pounds and seem to be steadily increasing to now 160. I am physically exhausted; I fall asleep the minute my head hits the pillow, and wake up as tired as if I had never slept. Granted I work all day, and then taking care of George in the evenings, I have a full day, and I don’t think I should feel as bad as I do at 49 years of age. I eat two pieces of rye toast with plum jelly for breakfast along with a cup of coffee with cream and sugar. At lunch I have salad greens with grilled chicken with a vinaigrette dressing, usually only 2 T of the dressing, along with a few crackers. At dinner I have a piece of meat along with a vegetable, sometimes some rice or noodles, no potatoes. At the time I went to the doctor he said my cholesterol was high. I was trying the Adkins diet and he blamed that for the results and told me to discontinue with that. In the past month I have gained 8 pounds and spiraling out of control for some reason. I have not added additional food. The only medication I take is moduretic (amiloride) to decrease fluid in my system due to Minere’s Disease in my inner ear and to prevent the debilitating vertigo that goes along with it. I have been taking this medication or 23 years. Could it be the medication? My blood
pressure is normally low. I had blood work done last year and everything was fine. For the past month I have been trying CLA as I read that it can help weight reduction. With what history I have given you, would I fit into the Syndrome X profile? I would appreciate your thoughts on this matter.

Answer:
You have presented a picture of long standing problems with some workups through the years and a yo-yo picture of weight control typical of an internal metabolic system not well balanced. Your history is further complicated by the meds you have been and are taking now which can have side effects including some of the symptoms you mentioned. Unfortunately, your picture is complicated and warrants a complete history and physical examination to be able to further dissect the problems on hand and return you to optimum health. As far as syndrome X is concern, you need to read my article which eludicate clearly the criteria if not already done so. Here is the link: Syndrome X The key parameters of overweight, high triglcyeride, high LDL, high total chol/triglyceride levels and high fasting sugar. I dont have the numbers so it is not possible to give you more details on this subject. I am more concern looking at your history of two matters which I think you need to address in the broader perspective that I think warrants further investigation to get to the root of the problem instead of trying to suppress symptoms which are simply warning signs of underlying problems. possible adrenal exhaustion b. female hormonal balance. c. Thyroid function These two are inter-related. Especially for women, it is critical to be well balanced. You have not given a hormonal history such as your periods and flow etc, and you are right at menopause. That alone can cause many of the symptoms you mention. Ask your doctor to check your estrogen and progesterone to make sure you do not have estrogen dominance syndrome. You claim that your thyroid function is ok, so that is good news. Do make sure that you have a free T4, free T3 , and TSH level to satisfy yourself of proper thyroid function. Read this:Hypothyroidism With the stress you are going through, pay attention to the adrenal gland function. Do a cortisol and DHEA test to see where you stand in terms of adrenal functions. I hope I have not confused you more than helping you. You are best in my view to find a naturally oriented physician near where you live to look into your health. Your problems are complex and need time, blood test, and follow up to sort it out. One thing you are right is that at your age, you should be able to run 5 miles a day at 10-13 minute pace and be full of energy. You are smart in taking steps to look into the problem.


Question:
There is lots of controversy about whether soy is good for breast cancer risk. What supports the thought you have that type A people should eat lots of tofu?

Answer:
There is tremendous debate occur as to the benefit of soy and breast cancer. Five years ago, studies are showing soy is good. Now it is the other way around. There are researches pointing to the use of tofu (10% dry weight contains lectin) which binds to cancer cells especially for type A people. I think this whole arena of research is unclear at best. The reason is simple: We are still at the infancy stage of understanding what nutrient can do what at what dosage. So it is common to have opposing studies since each study try to isolate the nutrient and come to a cause-effect relationship which is not possible. You have to understand that nutrients do not behave like drugs. The curve is not linear, and the results often are paradoxical, depending on dosage. For example, 100 mg of Vitamin C is an anti-oxidant, while 10,000 of vitamin C acts as an oxidant. It is therefore common to be confused unless you are into the research.
I would suggest that until the science is more definitive, which will take another 10 years; you stay on the side of moderation. Fermented soy such as miso, tempeh, and natto are very good. Unfermented soy such as tofu should be taken in moderation at best.


Question:
I am a 32-year old female and was tested in November and had a low TSH and low T3. After one month of being on Armour thyroid (gradually working up to 45 mg) my T3 was in the high normal range and my TSH was suppressed further (.03) My doctor lowered my Armour to 30 mg. He also tested my pregnenalone which was in the mid-range of normal. I guess he ruled out adrenal fatigue because of the normal pregnenalone.
I also had RAST testing and was a 6 for eggs and dairy and 3’s for wheat and beef. I know there can be a connection between food allergies and adrenal fatigue. What exactly is it? Does adrenal fatigue cause allergies?
I checked in with my doctor last week still complaining of severe mood swings, hair loss, and fatigue. He ran another thyroid panel to discover a TSH of .018, a T3 total of 89 and a T4 total of 9.4 and 1.35 free T4.
I am waiting to hear from my doctor about these results. What, in your opinion is going on? Why is my TSH level becoming more suppressed, but yet my T3 level is still relatively low? What treatment or further testing would you recommend?

Answer:
As you are being supplemented on armour thyroid, your TSH will drop. I don’t have your free T3 and its reference range. Total T 3 is of little value. The best way to diagnose adrenal fatigue is by cortisol level and DHEA, not pregnenolone in my view. I am unable to offer you much advice as the key pieces of information are missing. Sometimes there is a lag. TSH will return to normal (under 2.0) while T3 gradually goes up. Sometimes if you have adrenal fatigue, that in itself may lead to estrogen dominance, and excessive estrogen blocks the conversion from T4 to T3. You can see therefore that the situation can get more complicated as a estrogen progesterone workup may be needed in addition to what you already have done. In the female, the dysfunction of thyroid-adrenal-ovarian axis is very common. It is very difficult to isolate one of the 3, and the conventional myopic attempt to treat them individually will normally fail. Perhaps you should discuss with your doctor more on a complete workup on thyroid (TSH, Free T3, Free T4) adrenal (cortsiol and DHEA-S), and ovarian (estrogen, progeterone) axis. Salivary test is preferred as they measure accurately the free hormone available to the cells. Once you have the entire test, then it is easier to decipher what is the underlay cause of your problem.


Question:
Is it more important to measure DHEA-S or DHEA in measuring DHEA levels — I am confused by this. My blood DHEA-S level is normal (148 on a scale of 48-247)- my saliva DHEA level is low (2) on a scale of 3-10. Should I retest with the saliva using the DHEA-S test (or is the DHEA sufficient) before considering supplementation with either or both DHEA and pregnenolone?

Answer:
DHEA itself cannot be measured easily as a hormone. All DHEA, blood or saliva, is measured by the bounded sulfate form which is called DHEA-S.
The blood DHEA-S measures the bound fraction and is an approximate level of the DHEA in your body. The saliva measures the free fraction and the DHEA which is bioactive and available to the cell. Conventional physicians do not believe in saliva test because they are not educated in this area. If you really study the picture, saliva test for hormones is much more accurate in my view.
Furthermore, DHEA test should be viewed together in conjunction with saliva cortisol as an indication of adrenal stress profile. Supplementing DHEA for the sake of low DHEA is seldom a long term solution unless the underlying adrenal dysfunction (as indicated by cortisol test and cortisol to dhea ratio) is rebalanced if corstisol is imbalance.


Question:
I am a UK resident and have been receiving treatment for my thyroid for two years after I had sub-acute thyroiditis in May 2001. My GP started me on Levothyroxine in October 2001 and gradually increased the dose to 150 mcg by Aug 2002. At this point I asked to see a consultant because I was still having problems, including extreme fatigue, loss of memory, depression, and irregular periods. The worst of it was the fatigue after exercise – I used to be fit, cycling 6 miles to and from work, long walks at the weekend, gardening etc, but found I could no longer do any of these activities. The consultant immediately reduced the dose of thyroxine to 100mcg and suggested that the fatigue was due to post-viral fatigue syndrome. Reducing the dose of thyroxine normalised my T4 and T3 levels, but I was still feeling ill. I suggested to the consultant that more tests should be done to rule out other causes before the problem could be attributed to post-viral fatigue, so he ordered a short synacthen test. The results were normal. After the test, I had a short period of about three weeks when I felt really good, could do a lot more exercise without feeling tired and really began to think I was on the road to recovery, but this didn’t last. Having read your web-page on adrenal fatigue and other pages like Dr Rind, I realised that the synacthen test is not really appropriate for my symptoms. Could you tell me if the test might even have been responsible for the turnaround in my symptoms i.e. could the chemicals in the test have kick-started my adrenal glands? Do you know of a doctor in the UK who might be a bit more up to date on adrenal fatigue testing?

Answer:
Your case is quite interesting. Without taking a more detailed history, these are just my general thoughts. It appears that your body is highly sensitive, and may have a sympathetic overreaction response. At the same time, your body may have developed sensitivity to epinephrine even though the amount produced is not very much. Many of the symptoms may also be suggestive hyper-thyrodism, and I am sure your doctor is already on top of this though the numbers may not show. The fact that short term hydrocortisone therapy helps is a good sign for your adrenals. I don’t know what stage of adrenal fatigue you are in, but it generally takes a few months for the symptoms to subside. This is especially true for the sympathetic nervous system, as there is no “opposing” hormone to epinephrine. Once your flight or fight response is activated and your epinephrine is produced, it has to be washed out of the body slowly and naturally. You may wish to do more exercise to “use it up”, or meditations as well. I think my adrenal fatigue protocol will help you, especially with the supplements and sleep portion. Propanolol just suppresses some symptoms and is not a long term solution as you know. I think in your case, laboratory numbers are going to be less helpful than if you listen to your body. Have a diary and go thru with your doctor what events that helps and what that aggravates your current symptoms. Please keep in mind that there is usually a primary underlying root stressor, and until the stressor is removed, which can be emotional, financial, conflicts etc., the condition will not get better.


Question:
I have been having problems such as exhaustion for some time now. In 1997 a saliva test showed my morning cortisol was 8 on a scale of 13-23 and my late night was 4 on a scale of 1-3. The naturopath told me my adrenal system was working in overdrive but didn’t really tell me what to do about it. Needless to say, I forgot about it until recently because I’ve been feeling much worse and doctors simply tell me to eat better and drink water. I’m a bit concerned about the earlier report and after reading your article feel that maybe I should be doing something about it. Do you suggest another test since I seem to be feeling worse? Should I see a doctor to see if there are supplements that would help strengthen my adrenal system if that is indeed the problem? I need to mention that I am naturally stressed; however the last six years have had more stressors packed into them than most people experience over the course of their lifetime.

Answer:
If you have read my article closely, you realize that a low morning and normal evening cortisol is characteristic of stage 1-2 adrenal fatigue. To accurately monitor your adrenal function, mapping of morning, noon, 5 pm, and bedtime cortisol, together with DEHA, is required. It is always good to do test and have updated information, especially if budget is not a problem. If finance is an issue, then simply following my adrenal fatigue protocol is the way to go. Yes there are supplements to help the adrenals, and they are all in my paper here: Adrenal Fatigue. Budget 6 months to 12 months to feel better.


Question:
I am a 45 year old female who has been experiencing low libido for the past few years. I have read about the Dr. Bermans’ work and decided to have my testosterone level checked. My total testosterone level was less than 10. I am otherwise a very healthy woman of normal weight, who’s very fit, with no major health problems. My doctor is totally against prescribing ANY testosterone supplement for me. Can you recommend any natural and/or safer ways to increase my testosterone level?

Answer:
Testosterone replacement should not be taken lightly. At your age, there are other natural supplements that can boost libido. Since testosterone in the female is made at the adrenal glands, fortification of the adrenal glands will help testosterone secretion. DHEA and pregnenolone are of particular importance. Make sure you are not suffering from adrenal fatigue. Also with your age and approaching menopause, some hormonal imbalance is to be expected and this can be overcome with natural progesterone and estriol, for example. The combinations are countless, depending on your condition. Make sure you are not suffering from estrogen dominance which can lead to low testosterone also. The following two articles should be read by you: On estrogen dominance, see this: Estrogen Dominance


Question:
I have had chronic cfs for about 10 years. Finally with good diet, walking and other stress reducing changes (such as a new job and lifestyle), things are beginning to alter. Also practice qigong 90-120 min./day. I am currently eliminating candida and boosting immunity which is helping with allergic reactions. I have many, many symptoms of adrenal exhaustion. My question: How to help replenish, regenerate, etc, very weak adrenals. Taking glandulars is coming at it too strongly right now. I react with anxiety if I go too fast and seem to get stimulated by ginseng. Licorice also raises my blood pressure. I was advised to use a magnatherm machine and this precipitated severe anxiety (advised by an ND.) Besides qigong I am looking for alternative something I can DO or USE rather than necessarily taking orally. I am looking for things such as homeopathics, or things that might seem strange to others. (Also, I have tried Cortef once but that created the same anxiety response.) I am doing the vit/min now until parasites clear, then may liver cleanse but am at a loss as to how to proceed with the adrenals. I know I need to go slow and I want to proceed naturally away from Rx meds.

Answer:
The best therapy for adrenal fatigue is sleeping on time. It is covered in my article if you have not yet read.
Furthermore, as you increase your oxygenation in the body, your immunity will build up. The best thing is to walk in the morning in a park near as many green leafy trees as possible as they release oxygen from sunrise to sunset.
You can also consider hydrogen peroxide by IV drip to reduce sub-clinical infections and increase immunity. Taking more mushrooms in your diet will also enhance immune response. Light massage to enhance lymphatic drainage, as well as sauna can complement your existing program. I think that will keep you quite busy!