Mental Health Ask Me Archives


Question:
My husband recently was diagnosed with an unstable angina and had stenting done to the diagonal artery. He was subsequently found to have high Lp-a levels (81 mgs). After a period of medication retesting found that the level had actually gone up to 93 mgs.
Q1. What is the reason for the increase within a one-two month period? Will these levels continue to rise?
Q2. What exactly is the “vitamin cocktail” you prescribe to lower Lp(a) levels? And in what dosage and how — through natural food, particular vitamins etc — should it be taken?
Q3. Is there a need to do a check for any other clogging sites? (Which might be existing silently?)

Answer:
LP(a) is genetically linked, and it reflects the increase in oxidation of lipoprotein when the body is subject to increased damage. The level will go up and down depending on the amount of endothelium and subendothelium damage of the vascular wall consistent with soft plaque formation. I usually give a 1 hour lecture just on this so it is not easy to condense it to a few sentences.
The cocktail consists of high dose of vitamin C (in the form of mixed mineral ascobate to avoid gastric irritation, fat soluble ascobyl palmitate to ensure longer staying power in the body, l-lysine, l-proline, and bioflavoniods) per day. The dosage is 3-5 grams of the special blend of ascobate, 2-3 grams of lysine, and .5-1 gram of proline. The exact dosage is highly dependent on the person because high dose of vitamin C can cause a harmless loose stool condition that reflects the cellular saturation point. That bowl saturation point varies from person to person, and some people reach that point at 1 gram, while others may not get there until 10 grams. So you need to titrate your self up slowly over 1-2 months period to the 3-5 grams of ascobate and the proper ratio of the rest without getting loose stool, and stay there for 3-6 months. After that you do another LP(a) and you will be pleasantly surprised. Natural food will not be able to supply the amount needed. Don’t forget an orange only supplies 65 mg of vitaminC.
You can practically assume that other sites are already clogged, or at least damaged to a smaller degree. You can do other tests such as C-reactive protein to confirm inflammatory response as well. It is not possible to have damage only to a small portion of our arterial highway system without some deterioration to the rest when your arterial system is over 40 years old. I would highly encourage you to also consider oral chelation to enhance endothelium health and rid of toxic metal like mercury which can irritate the endothelium leading to soft plaques. Read more here:
Chelation


Question:
I recently had blood work done that showed my Lp(a) levels to be very high. My family doctor has put me on Niacin, but I’m not tolerating it well even at 600/mg day and I know I’m supposed to work up to a much higher level.
Your site recommeded a Vit C, L-Lysine, L-Proline cocktail as another option for lowering Lp(a). I’ve read this in other places, but haven’t been given any dosage levels to start with, or even sources that I can ask my doctor to look at so he can determine dosage levels. What are the recommended dosage levels? Is there a product that already combines them in the correct ratios?
What are potential side effects?

Answer:
Niacin in high dose has not been shown to lower lp(a). It will bring down the total cholesterol level, and give you a lot of flushing. The proper combination of vitamin C, Lysine, and Proline is the only way to bring Lp(a) down. The blend is the most important. The dosage varies from person to person, especially since vitamin C can cause some loose bowl at high dose once you have reach your cell saturation level. I have treated many successfully, and generally speaking, a dosage of 3-5 grams of vitamin C including special forms of fat soluable for longer half-life as well as mineral chelated form is needed to avoid gastric irritation at this dose, with addition 1.5-3 grams of lysine and 500mg to 1 gram of proline will do the job very nicely over 3 -6 months period.


Question:
I am writing for a friend who has just been diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease. Is there anything in the vitamin, herb, or natural realm that will help her in any way? I want to help her all I can. She is overweight and now in a wheel chair; therefore the chances of her losing weight are really limited. She is 70 yrs. old. Eats terribly, lots of cinnamon rolls and things like that, which I know can contribute to bad health.

Answer:
Some people have found improvements by doing hydrogen peroxide drip as an oxidative therapy and to reduce subclinical infectious cause which may contribute to this disease. Concurrently, IV and oral chelation therapy to remove toxic metal thought to aggravate this condition. That is the cutting edge when all else fails. The above may be new to you, and you may not have even heard of it. You can search the internet for more information.


Question:
My Lp(a)levels are very high (77). I am premenopausal and have my lifesyle includes regular aerobic exercise and a healthy diet. I am very worried about my levels and would like to know the recommeded dosages for your recommended cocktail and any dietary changes I should make.

Answer:
Lp(a) can be reduced effectively only with a cocktail of high dose ascobic acid (3-5 grams a day) together with high dose lysine (2-4 grams), proline (1-2 grams). Carnitine is also very helpful and some bioflavonoids.
High dose of ascorbic can cause gastric irritation, for my patients, I normally use a mixture with mineral ascobates. I also add fat soluable ascobyl palmitate (100-200mg) which has a pharmcologoical equivalent many times more potent than regular ascobic. I use a premixed form that has all these to save trouble for my patients. Don’t forget that you have to scale up slowly if you are not used to taking supplements, and high doses can cause diarrhea.


Question:
Does heavy exercise (say 8 Kilometers fast walk daily) helps reducing Lp(a) ?
My Lp(a ) reading is 59. My mother and father do not have this problem. How can I link it to genetics? I do not consume alcohol, tobacco, non vegetarian food, oily / fatty food, etc. Still why is my Lp(a) is high?

Answer:
Lp(a) is a genetically linked risk factor that is not related to exercise in and of itself. It has nothing to do with your lifestyle. You can have perfect lifestyle and have a high Lp(a). In my site under my opinion, I have written an article on this for you to study if you visit: Lipoprotein (a) – How To Reduce


Question:
What about the Warfarin warnings?

Answer:
Warfarin is an anticoagulant used to thin the blood and prevent it from clotting. It is a somewhat dangerous drug that can be affected by many substances, including foods. If you are taking warfarin, we don’t recommend taking any herb or supplement except on a physician’s advice. Vitamin K is an antidote to warfarin and directly counteracts its effects. Do not take vitamin K while you are on warfarin.Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a substance somewhat similar in structure to vitamin K, and reportedly it, too, can reduce the effects of warfarin. Vitamin C, when taken in high dosages (more than 1, 000 mg daily), has been reported to reduce the blood-thinning effect of warfarin.
As long as a person is on blood thinner, all herbs and nutrients that have potential blood thinning effect must be handled with extreme care. The list is very long indeed. You can see therefore that caution is very necessary.


Question:
If CoQ10 is not a coagulant, then how come it acts as a coagulant with Warfarin? Also, one of the usages of Vitamin C is to brake up clots or thrombosises. How can Vitamin C then be perceived as a coagulant?

Answer:
When it comes to nutrients, there are many things we still don’t know. Vitamin C is both an anti-oxidant and a pro-oxidant, depending on the dosage. This is data from the last 10 years only. Similarly, phyto-estrogen such as soy is both an estrogen inhibitor and enhancer. There is much we don’t know, and scientific studies trying to isolate one single variable and drawing empharical conclusions with limited ability to control can be very dangerous. We read in the press all the time the conflicting reports, both in nutrition and drugs. That is why, for example, there are 500 studies that say that hormone replacement therapy is good and 500 others pointing the opposite. This is after 40 years of intensive research among the top brains in the world. Clearly the subject matter is highly complex and we have yet to fully understand it. The good news is that if you take the time to really read all the studies over time and digest the details and scrutinize them slowly, a general picture will gradually form in your own mind, and that is what makes a professional a professional in the absence at this time of solid data demanded by modern medicine. And that is why the practice of medicine is not only a science but an art, especially in nutritional medicine.
For the general consumer not privileged to have spent years studying the subject, our general recommendation is simple: when in doubt, do not take it. Otherwise, err on the side of slightly excessive dosage. Sounds contradicting? Not at all if you have a good grasp of the underlying delimina. Why? We simply are aging too fast and the window is closing in too quickly. Often, drugs are worse . Provided that the risk is low and harmless, most aging and adults afflicted with disease will opt for natural therapy if given a chance.


Question:
I heard, from my doctor, that DHEA is not good for the brain. That people who have taken it for three or more years can see the on set of Alzheimers Disease. Is there any factual basis to this allegation?

Answer:
The concept of low dose DHEA being linked to AD was advance in 1999 by James Michael Howard, www.naples.net is his website and you can find many interesting DHEA related articles based on his views.
Subsequent to his postulation, the following article, plus many many others, seems to suggest the opposite. The following are some extracts just for your information. You can find many more. Most researchers points to low DHEA-S levels in Alzheimer’s dementia. For example, Researchers T. Yanase and colleagues  have studied and compare the serum concentrations of DHEA-S in 19 patients with Alzheimer’s dementia and control group of age 45 and gender matched elderly individuals. The patients with Alzheimer’s dementia were found to have lower concentrations of serum DHEA-S. Interestingly, one preliminary clinical trial based on an intravenous administration of 200 mg a day of DHEA-S for 8 weeks suggested slight and modest improvements in cognition and behavior in patients with Alzheimer’s dementia and cerebrovascular dementia, respectively. The current thinking is that ecreases in plasma levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may contribute to the development of some age-related disorders. Along with neuroprotective and memory enhancing effects, DHEA has been shown to display antioxidant properties. Moreover, oxidative stress is known to cause lipid peroxidation and degenerative changes in the hippocampus, an area involved in memory processes and especially afflicted in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). It will be decades away before anyone absolutely can show exactly how DHEA works and the long term reminifications. Vitamin C has been researched for closed to 50 years, and there is still tremendous debate within mainstream medicine on what is the optimum dose, for example.
You have asked an excellent question, and I think the answer to your question does not rest with any single study, positive or negative, but with a global perspective on the body and reading enough article on your own to come to an consensus yourself on what is the right thing to do. No amount of “science” can convince a skeptical mind.


Question:
My mother had a stroke three years ago which has taken the use of the left hand side of her body. Under Doctors orders she takes one aspirin a day. She also takes a Garlic Tablet a day as she has done for a number of years. Recently I read that aspirin and garlic should not be taken together is this correct and should she stop taking the garlic. she is aged 75.

Answer:
Garlic has some blood thinning properties, and so does vitamin E and gingko. Taking high doses of these concurrently with aspirin or other blood thinning drugs such as coumadin should be under the supervision of a physician. Normal garlic capsules are low in potency and one capsule a day generally does not cause any problem. The best thing to do if you are concerned is to ask your doctor to check out her clotting time and see if it is ok.


Question:
What are foods that can increase memory?

Answer:
Research has shown that eating blueberries may help fight age-related memory loss in rodents and, by extension, perhaps in humans. Cooked blueberries, as in a blueberry pie, might be good for you. Eating strawberries and spinach may have similar benefits. Not to be forgotten is gingko that increases blood flow to the brain and enhances memory.


Question:
I would like to find out what nutritional items might help to reverse neuropathy. I have been off of Cordarone for 4 months but believe the peripheral neuropathy I have was caused by the drug. I seem to have stopped A-Fib since decreasing my calcium intake and increasing the magnesium but have not been able to find anything written about reversing neuropathies. If you can help, I would appreciate it. I also take Chromium, Selenium, and Vitamin E and Vitamin C since the 60’s.

Answer:
Of all vitamins , the B complex family ( esp thiamine B1) is best for neurological function. Injections of B1 are given for peripheral neuropathy. It works about half the time. Other B complexes must also be taken as well.
Dosage is usually much higher than that found in a normal vitamin pill for these actions. Thiamine 320 mg, b12 of 1000 mcg for example. High dose s ( 1 to 4 grams) have been used successfully where harmaceutical pain fillers have failed.
Consult a knowledgeable nutritionally oriented physician close to you for further info.