Spinach Wraps

By: Dorine Lam, RDN, MS, MPH


Ingredients

  • 10 oz. frozen organic spinach, defrosted, squeezed the liquid out, or 1½ lb. fresh organic baby spinach, chopped
  • 1 box organic firm tofu, drained, cubed and seasoned with salt and pepper
  • 1 medium-sized white onion, finely chopped
  • ¼ cup sun-dried tomato, chopped
  • 1 Tbsp. olive oil or grapeseed oil
  • 8 large rice paper wraps

Raw Version Method:

  1. Mix the spinach, tofu, onion, sun-dried tomato, and olive oil.
  2. Dip the rice paper in warm water, take the rice paper out of the water, and lay it on a plate. The rice paper will soften in a few seconds.
  3. Put the spinach mixture in the bottom ⅓ of the wrap, fold the bottom of the wrap up, and roll it up to ¾ of its length. Fold in the two corners and roll to the end.

Cooked Version Method:

  1. In a frying pan, sauté the onion in the olive or grapeseed oil. Add spinach, tofu, and sun-dried tomato; gently stir. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  2. Dip the rice paper in warm water, take the rice paper out of the water, and lay it on a plate. The rice paper will soften in a few seconds.
  3. Put the spinach mixture in the bottom ⅓ of the wrap, fold the bottom of the wrap up, and roll it up to ¾ of its length. Fold in the two corners and roll it to the end.

Note: For estrogen dominance and hypothyroid, you might want to substitute tempeh (fermented tofu) for the tofu. You can also use organic ground beef, chicken, or turkey instead of tofu.

Spinach WrapsTofu is made in much the same way cheese is made. First, soymilk is allowed to curdle. Then, the curds are pressed and cooled. Tofu has almost no flavor, but absorbs the flavor of any food it is cooked with, making it a great addition to nearly any recipe. The texture of tofu is influenced by the way it is cooked.

Tofu is one of the most complete plant-based proteins available, which is why it is so popular among vegetarians. Tofu is also an excellent source of various minerals including iron, calcium, manganese, phosphorus, selenium, magnesium, and copper. Calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus may help strengthen teeth and bones, and reduce the risk of developing osteoporosis.

Proteins are a centerpiece of the optimal adrenal fatigue diet. They provide long lasting energy as they are digested, broken down and processed over time. Compared to carbohydrates and sugars, they do not cause spiking and crashing of blood sugar levels that cause hypoglycemic episodes and metabolic imbalances, both issues for adrenal fatigue sufferers.

Tofu and other soy foods contain phytoestrogens very similar to human estrogen. For women in menopause, consuming soy may help counter the drop in natural estrogen enough to ease the symptoms. However, those who are estrogen dominant may wish to use fermented tofu, known as tempeh, in place of tofu.

Adrenal fatigue sufferers should also strongly consider tempeh, since they, too, will suffer from hormone imbalances and often estrogen dominance. Fermentation also changes the character of the protein, making it easier to ingest and digest, as well as generating nutrients that help the microorganisms of your digestive tract to thrive and boost digestive health.

If you’re like most people who grew up in the 20th century, you probably remember Popeye and the super strength he would gain from eating a can of spinach. While eating a can of spinach isn’t going to cause your muscles to suddenly bulge through your shirt, the sailor man was onto something with this superfood.

Spinach is highly nutrient dense. Low in calories, spinach is a great source of vitamins A, B2, B6, C, and K, along with folate, magnesium, manganese, iron, calcium, potassium, copper, selenium, niacin, and omega-3 fatty acids. Spinach makes a great salad, and is far more nutritious than the more popular iceberg lettuce.


Spinach Wraps